Clinical Laboratory Science Job Opportunities

Find Career and Employment Opportunities in Clinical Laboratory Science

Clinical laboratory science degrees teach students what they need to know to work in a medical or research lab. By pursuing this career field, students will be prepared to wok as a forensic science technician or clinical laboratory technologist.

Clinical Laboratory Science Degree Programs

Clinical laboratory science degree programs focus on the analysis of tissues and fluid samples. This is important in detecting for illnesses and disease. This is essential in order for doctors to come of with an accurate diagnosis and to recommend treatment options. Depending on the actual career an individual within this area chooses to pursue, educational requirements can vary from an associate degree to a master’s degree. Students that complete their education in this field may be prepared to pursue a career forensic science technician or clinical laboratory technologist.

Clinical Laboratory Technologist Job Opportunities for Clinical Laboratory Science Degree Graduates

Clinical laboratory technologists conduct chemical analysis of blood, spinal fluid, urine, and other body fluids. They analyze lab findings and check for result accuracy. They also enter data from analysis of medical tests and clinical results into a computer for storage. They utilize equipment that is needed for qualitative and quantitative analysis, and some of these include:

  • Flame photometers
  • Calorimeters
  • Spectrophotometers
  • Computer-controlled analyzers

They may also establish and monitor quality assurance programs and activities to ensure the accuracy of lab results. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual salary for professional in this field in 2009 was $55,140 or $26.51 per hour. The projected growth of this field is average with an estimated 53,300 job openings through 2018.

Forensic Science Technician Job Opportunities for Clinical Laboratory Science Degree Graduates

Forensic science technicians collect evidence from crime scenes. They store evidence in conditions that will preserve it and keep records detailing findings, lab techniques, and investigative methods. They use chemicals to examine fingerprint evidence and compare prints to those of known individuals in databases. They may need to testify in court about analytical methods and findings or investigations and may take photographs of evidence. They also need to examine scenes of crimes and visit morgues for additional evidence. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual salary for a professional in this field in 2009 was $51,840, or $24.75 per hour. Job growth in this field is expected to be much faster than average with an anticipated 8,000 job openings through 2018.

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