Continuing Education and Establishing Goals

How to Succeed in College by Establishing Goals

Establishing goals is extremely important in being successful at a college or university. Many students choose to completely immerse themselves in the college experience, and planning before starting school can often be beneficial. Establishing goals will help students to accomplish what they want to and stay on track during times of crisis. College can be a stressful yet important time. This article discusses the importance of establishing goals in order to get the most out of your educational experience.

How to Assess Yourself

Students should take time to assess themselves before developing goals. This may include taking personality tests, but often it just consists of introspection. This may include thinking about what a person has accomplished in the past. Some questions a person can ask themselves include:

  • What accomplishment are you most proud of?
  • What types of challenges do you enjoy?
  • Do you have any goals in life? If you do, how can you achieve these goals?
  • What are your strengths?
  • When were you happiest?
  • How do you approach a challenge?
  • What kind of activities do you like to take part in?
  • What are your weaknesses?

How to Assess Your Goals

Students should them determine which goals they want to set for themselves, but they should not worry if the goals change in the future. Some goals could include obtaining a certain GPA, becoming active in certain organizations, or earning a leadership position. Students may also develop goals to become a mentor, work, act in a play, or become a starter on a college sports team.

How to Establish Your Goals

Writing down the goals will make them more concrete and official rather than being lofty and subjective. Students should also give themselves a certain amount of time to reach each goal, so deadlines are essential to stay on track. These goals can range from small accomplishments to lifelong goals, and they can encompass a person’s academic and social life. Establishing these goals will help students to make them happen.

Continuing Education Institutions

Continuing Education Courses and Job Opportunities

There are a variety of different options for individuals who choose to pursue adult education. These options include completing courses at a university, college, community college, online program, trade or technical school, or vocational school. Individuals who graduate from high school or choose to go back to school later in life often have a difficult time choosing which continuing education program is best for them, so some of the options are explained in detail below.

Typical Four Year Continuing Education Programs

A college or university that allows students to pursue a four year degree represents the traditional idea of higher education. These institutions can be private or public, and the cost of tuition and the size of the classes are usually the only differences between the two. Most public universities have less expensive tuition than private schools, but the class sizes are usually larger. Classes in public universities are usually held in large lecture halls, so students that would like more one-on-one attention should consider the student to teacher ratio at the colleges they consider attending.

Most colleges and universities require students to take the ACT or SAT exams and fill out an admissions application in order to be admitted to the school. Application fees are also required. Enrollment is usually permitted at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters.

Typical Community College Continuing Education Programs

Associate’s degrees are usually available at a community college, and these institutions are generally cheaper than a traditional four year college of university. These classes are often very diverse, as there are many adults attending the same courses as younger students. Community colleges are generally the place to begin if you are considering going back to school after a long absence, and generally exam scores on the ACT or SAT are not required for admission. Community colleges have lower tuition than other schools, and they allow for students to readjust to the demands that going to school require. Prospective students should talk to a school guidance counselor or admissions officer to see which community college, if any, will work best for them.

Typical Technical School Continuing Education Programs

Technical, trade, or vocational schools specialize in training students for a specific career field. Programs that are studied in these institutions are technical in nature, and they can include:

  • Electrician
  • Plumbing
  • Air conditioning technician
  • Certified nursing assistant
  • Truck Driver
  • Cosmetologist

If a student already knows what they want to do and prefer hands-on learning techniques, a technical school may be right for them. Many colleges and universities will accept transfer credits from these schools, so pursuing a four year degree in the future may be an option for technical school participants.

Typical Online Continuing Education Programs

Online educational programs are becoming increasingly popular. Many allow students to do their coursework from anywhere in the world as long as they have computer and Internet access. This allows students to continue to work full-time and commit to family obligations while pursuing their education. The convenience of this program can also be beneficial if an individual has problems with transportation. However, when pursuing an online educational program, it is important for students to ensure that the school they wish to attend is accredited by an accrediting agency of the U.S. Department of Education.

Continuing Education in Real Estate

Continuing Education Units (CEU), Courses, and Credits in Real Estate

Real estate professionals are required to stay abreast on all the latest trends, laws, and regulations of the real estate business. Not only do they need to complete coursework in these areas while obtaining their license, they will also need to take continuing education courses throughout their career to gain new knowledge and skills that will better assist them in selling properties.

Continuing Education in Real Estate

Continuing education in real estate is required in a variety of states in order to maintain or renew real estate licensure. For example, the California Department of Real Estate requires real estate licenses to complete 45 hours of continuing education courses every four years in order to renew their license. The Ohio Division of Real Estate outlines the state of Ohio’s requirements to include the completion of 30 hours of continuing education every three years, and the state of Florida’s Department or Business and Professional Regulation requires the completion of 14 hours every two years.

Continuing Education Courses in Teaching

In order to determine the continuing education course requirements that they need to complete, real estate agents should check with the state in which they are licensed. Some states like California will require courses to be completed within a certain area, while others may not have these specifications. Continuing education coursework for real estate professionals may include some of the following topics:

  • Trust fund handling
  • Risk management
  • Fair housing
  • Agency
  • Ethics
  • Consumer service
  • Consumer protection
  • Civil rights

Continuing Education in GPS Training

Continuing Education Units (CEU), Courses, and Credits in GPS Training

GPS stands for global positioning systems. Skills in this field are highly desirable for a number of professions, and students can help to advance their careers by taking continuing education coursework in GPS training.

Continuing Education in GPS Training

A GPS is a satellite-based system that can locate any position on Earth, and it is not affected by weather or time. It can be used for military activities, as it was created by the U.S. Department of Defense, or it can also be used in navigating systems, mapping, and surveying. It works by using a GPS receiver on the ground that tracks signals from satellites that orbit Earth, and it can then calculate the location based off the time it takes for the receive to get the signal.

Continuing Education Courses in GPS Training

GPS training programs can be offered at community colleges, technical schools, vocational schools, colleges, and universities around the country. Government agencies also provide workshops and training sessions about how to use this system, as well. Employers may also offer a program or training in this system to their workers, as well, and some topics for discussion include:

  • Mapping projections
  • Setting up the terrain navigator
  • Converting coordinates
  • Survey data adjustments
  • Fundamentals of geodesy
  • GPS receiver functions

Continuing Educations in GPS Training Users

GPS technology is used in a variety of businesses, including biomedical sciences, agriculture, recreation, and construction. It also has a very important role in some of the following additional activities:

  • Collecting census data and information
  • Emergency planning
  • Public works
  • Environmental monitoring
  • Design of transportation systems
  • Geology
  • Geography
  • Geophysics
  • GIS data collection
  • Engineering
  • Land management
  • Natural resource management

Continuing Education in Environmental Law

Continuing Education Units (CEU), Courses, and Credits in Environmental Law

Continuing education in environmental law allows professionals to retain their licensure and job as an attorney. Specific requirements may vary depending on the state in which the contract lawyer practices.

Continuing Education in Environmental Law

Continuing education is essential in order to ensure that a professional is doing their job well and up to standards set forth by the state in which they work. The field of environmental law is no different, and much of the continuing education work that these professionals go through has to do with professional ethics. By keeping up to date on continuing education requirements, environmental lawyers will ensure that they are best meeting their client’s needs by staying informed and knowledgeable about relevant topics.

Continuing Education Courses in Environmental Law

Lawyers including those that work in environmental law are expected to completed coursework in continuing legal education. This coursework is typically completed by attending legal seminars, teleconferences, and webinars. Some topics that could be covered as a part of continuing legal education for environmental lawyers includes:

  • Financial exploitation of seniors
  • Secured transactions
  • Healthcare antitrust fundamentals
  • Forensic science and current evidentiary issues
  • Class action suits
  • Securities fraud
  • Negotiating business acquisitions
  • White collar crime

Continuing Education Requirements in Environmental Law

To maintain a law license within the state a lawyer is working, the Supreme Court in that state has imposed certain requirements. Those requirements typically include maintaining membership to the State Bar and complying with the conditions such as membership, fulfilling continuing legal education requirements, and adhering to its rules of Professional Conduct. For example, in the state of Wisconsin, lawyers need 30 continuing legal education credits every two years. Three of those 30 need to be approved coursework in the area of legal ethics and professional responsibility.

Continuing Education in Early Childhood Education

Continuing Education Units (CEU), Courses, and Credits in Early Childhood Education

Early childhood education teachers typically educate students up to 5 years of age. They are responsible for teaching them fundamental skills that will be needed as the further their education and for life in general. They also provide children with a positive adult role model and work to help children through their stages of growth and development. In order to stay abreast on current topics in order to better help the students that they serve, most states impose continuing education requirements for early childhood educators. These requirements will help guidance counselors to acquire new knowledge and skills that can be used to assist students with the learning process.

Continuing Education in Early Childhood Education

Continuing education programs for early childhood educators are typically needed in order for these professionals to maintain their state licensure and continue teaching. Many of these courses are completed at a college or university campus, while some can even be completed online with the school’s continuing education department. Workshops that an early childhood education teacher may attend anyways can also be a great place to both learn new skill and knowledge and to gain continuing education units, or credits.

Continuing Education Courses in Early Childhood Education

There are a variety of continuing education courses available for early childhood education teachers, and many of the course offerings are the same for school teachers. Some of the courses an early childhood teacher may be able to take include:

  • Attention Deficit Disorder
  • Advanced classroom management
  • Early childhood: Family-centered services
  • Early childhood: Observations & assessment
  • Early childhood: Program planning
  • Early childhood: Typical and atypical development
  • Educational assessment: Assessing student learning in the classroom
  • Harassment, bullying, and cyber-intimidation in schools
  • Autism and Asperger’s Disorder
  • Strategies for managing disruptive behavior
  • Drugs and alcohol in schools
  • The effects of stress, trauma, and violence on student learning
  • Understanding aggression

Continuing Education Requirements in Early Childhood Education

Continuing education requirements for all teachers, including those that specialize in early childhood education, are dependent upon the state in which the teacher works. For example, the state of Wisconsin requires that in order for teachers to renew their license they complete six semester hours of coursework every five years. This requirement will vary from state to state, and students should check with the specific licensing and regulation department in their state to determine what requirements they should follow.

Continuing Education in Contract Law

Continuing Education Units (CEU), Courses, and Credits in Contract Law

Continuing education in contract law allows professionals to retain their licensure and job as an attorney. Specific requirements may vary depending on the state in which the contract lawyer practices.

Continuing Education in Contract Law

Continuing education is essential in order to ensure that a professional is doing their job well and up to standards set forth by the state in which they work. The field of contract law is no different, and much of the continuing education work that these professionals go through has to do with professional ethics. By keeping up to date on continuing education requirements, contract lawyers will ensure that they are best meeting their client’s needs by staying informed and knowledgeable about relevant topics.

Continuing Education Courses in Contract Law

Individuals that have pursued a career and education in contract law typically have a variety of continuing education courses to choose from. Some of the most popular options for continuing education courses in this field include:

  • Adequacy of Consideration
  • Unenforceable Contacts
  • Unilateral and Bilateral Contracts
  • Executor and Executed Contracts
  • Entire or Severable Contracts
  • Voidable and Void Contacts
  • Oral and Written Contracts
  • Electronic Contracts
  • Equitable Estoppel
  • Express and Implied Contracts
  • Theory of Mutual Assent

Continuing Education Requirements in Contract Law

To maintain a law license within the state a lawyer is working, the Supreme Court in that state has imposed certain requirements. Those requirements typically include maintaining membership to the State Bar and complying with the conditions such as membership, fulfilling continuing legal education requirements, and adhering to its rules of Professional Conduct. For example, in the state of Wisconsin, lawyers need 30 continuing legal education credits every two years. Three of those 30 need to be approved coursework in the area of legal ethics and professional responsibility.

Continuing Education in Accounting Technology

Continuing Education Units (CEU), Courses, and Credits in Accounting Technology

Accounting technology degrees can typically be completed in two years, and they are closely related to business and financial accounting programs. Some of the information below will inform you about accounting technology as well as continuing education requirements and courses for graduates.

What is Accounting Technology?

Accounting technology is typically a program offered at the associate degree level. This program helps students to develop skills and knowledge that they can use to prepare for a business accounting career. Students will need to learn a variety of information, including:

  • General accounting
  • Cost accounting
  • Financial analysis
  • Income tax
  • Auditing
  • Management advisory services
  • Budgeting

Continuing Education Courses in Accounting Technology

Students that work in the field of accounting technology may be required to complete continuing education courses in order to stay up-to-date on developments within the industry. Some possible courses that accountants or accounting technologists may be able to choose for continuing education credits include:

  • Tax Relief Act
  • Estate planning
  • Limited liabilities
  • Residential rental properties
  • Tax benefits for education
  • Taxation of pension and annuity income
  • Like-kind exchanges and other sales
  • Individual income tax

Locations for Continuing Education Courses in Accounting Technology

Accounting technology degree programs and continuing education courses are typically available at community colleges, technical schools, college, or universities. Some of these schools may also offer continuing education courses online, and entire degrees in the accounting field can also be earned online. Students should contact the school in which they graduated in order to determine if they offer any continuing education courses to adult learners.

Continuing Education for Teachers Specializing in Special Ed

Continuing Education Units (CEU), Courses, and Credits for Teachers Specializing in Special Ed

Special education teachers have a unique and challenging role within the education system. In order to perform their jobs successfully, continuing education coursework may be required.

Continuing Education in Teaching Special Ed

Continuing education programs for special education teachers are designed to produce professionals that are equipped with the knowledge, skills, and competencies they need to help students with physical, developmental, or leaning disabilities in a variety of settings. Many states will require public school teachers to complete special education requirements in order to maintain or renew their teaching license, and specific requirements will vary by state.

Continuing Education Courses in Teaching Special Ed

There are a variety of continuing education courses available for teachers, and many of the course offerings are the same for school teachers. Some of the courses a teacher may be able to take include:

  • Attention Deficit Disorder
  • Advanced classroom management
  • Early childhood: Family-centered services
  • Early childhood: Observations & assessment
  • Early childhood: Program planning
  • Early childhood: Typical and atypical development
  • Educational assessment: Assessing student learning in the classroom
  • Harassment, bullying, and cyber-intimidation in schools
  • Autism and Asperger’s Disorder
  • Strategies for managing disruptive behavior
  • Drugs and alcohol in schools
  • The effects of stress, trauma, and violence on student learning
  • Understanding aggression

Continuing Education Requirements in Teaching Special Ed

Continuing education requirements for all teachers, including those with certain specializations, are dependent upon the state in which the teacher works. For example, the state of Wisconsin requires that in order for teachers to renew their license they complete six semester hours of coursework every five years. This requirement will vary from state to state, and students should check with the specific licensing and regulation department in their state to determine what requirements they should follow.

Continuing Education for Teachers

Continuing Education Units (CEU), Courses, and Credits in Teaching

Teachers typically work with students up until the age of 18, depending on what their area of specialization is. They are responsible for teaching students fundamental skills that will be needed as the further their education and for life in general. They also provide children with a positive adult role model and work to help children through their stages of growth and development. In order to stay abreast on current topics in order to better help the students that they serve, most states impose continuing education requirements for early childhood educators. These requirements will help guidance counselors to acquire new knowledge and skills that can be used to assist students with the learning process.

Continuing Education in Teaching

Continuing education programs for teachers are typically needed in order for these professionals to maintain their state licensure and continue teaching. Many of these courses are completed at a college or university campus, while some can even be completed online with the school’s continuing education department. Workshops that a teacher may attend anyways can also be a great place to both learn new skill and knowledge and to gain continuing education units, or credits.

Continuing Education Courses in Teaching

There are a variety of continuing education courses available for teachers, and many of the course offerings are the same for school teachers. Some of the courses a teacher may be able to take include:

  • Attention Deficit Disorder
  • Advanced classroom management
  • Early childhood: Family-centered services
  • Early childhood: Observations & assessment
  • Early childhood: Program planning
  • Early childhood: Typical and atypical development
  • Educational assessment: Assessing student learning in the classroom
  • Harassment, bullying, and cyber-intimidation in schools
  • Autism and Asperger’s Disorder
  • Strategies for managing disruptive behavior
  • Drugs and alcohol in schools
  • The effects of stress, trauma, and violence on student learning
  • Understanding aggression

Continuing Education Requirements in Teaching

Continuing education requirements for all teachers, including those with certain specializations, are dependent upon the state in which the teacher works. For example, the state of Wisconsin requires that in order for teachers to renew their license they complete six semester hours of coursework every five years. This requirement will vary from state to state, and students should check with the specific licensing and regulation department in their state to determine what requirements they should follow.