Precision Metal Working Degree Job Opportunities

Find Career and Employment Opportunities in Precision Metal Working

Precision metal working degrees allow students to make and repair metal items. Individuals that have completed this degree program will be prepared to work as a sheet metal worker, metalworking machine operator, or tool maker.

Precision Metal Working Degree Programs

Degree programs in this field teach students about metal products and the importance of paying close attention to detail. Students will be able to work with their hands and deal with unique challenges each day. Most coursework will focus on mathematics, blueprints, basic reading, and metal-related courses, but actual courses required will depend on specializations. By pursuing this type of degree program, students will be prepared to work as a tool maker, sheet metal worker, or metalworking machine operator.

Metalworking Machine Operator Job Opportunities for Precision Metal Working Degree Graduates

Machine operators work with a variety of machinery and tools in order to produce parts and instruments. They will be required to calculate the dimensions and tolerances of machines and they should know the knowledge of math and instruments. They select the appropriate materials, tools, and machines to be used in preparation of machinery work. They will set up, adjust, and operate basic machine tools and will work to detect defects. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual salary for a metalworking machine operator in 2009 was $37,650 or $18.10 per hour. This career field is expecting to see a decline at a slow or moderate level through 2018.

Sheet Metal Worker Job Opportunities for Precision Metal Working Degree Graduates

Sheet metal workers assemble, repair, and install sheet metal equipment and products. This could include furnace casings, ducts, drainpipes, control boxes, and other things. They may need to set up and work fabricating machines that bend, straighten, and cut sheet metal. They may also need to shape metal over blocks and forms using a hammer. They could also be asked to operate a soldering or welding machine to join parts together. They determine the requirements of a project according to drawings, instructions, and blueprints and then work diligently in order to meet those requirements. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual salary for a sheet metal worker in 2009 was $40,640 or $19.54 per hour. The projected job growth in this field is expected to be slower than average at 3-6%, and there are 51,700 anticipated job openings in this field through 2018.

Tool Maker Job Opportunities for Precision Metal Working Degree Graduates

Tool makers work to lay out metal stock, set up and operate machines, and assemble parts to make cutting tools, fixtures, gauges, and hand tools. They need to study sketches, models, blueprints, and other information to plan for operations. They also verify alignments and dimensions and operate conventional or computer controlled machine tools. They will also run tests with completed tools to ensure that parts are working properly and make adjustments as necessary. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual salary for a tool maker in 2009 was $46,900 or $22.55 per hour. This field is expected to have a slow to moderate decline through 2018 of -3% to -9%.

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